If you are in crisis, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). They provide free, confidential, 24/7 support by phone.

Working and advocating for improved mental health outcomes through awareness, education, and improved treatments.

June 6 | Join us for our inaugural fundraising event: The Brett C. Bowers Memorial Golf Tournament!

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We’re excited to host our inaugural fundraising event for The Mom & Mitchell Foundation, a non-profit charity dedicated to fostering mental wellness and preventing suicide.

Brett C. Bowers

One of our programs is the Clarence Program, through which we encourage people to find their Clarence — a trusted friend, mentor, or confidant who can help support them in challenging times. We invite you and the Clarence in your life to join us as at this exciting inaugural event.

Can’t come during the day but still want to support The Mom & Mitchell Foundation? Join us for our dinner and silent auction event with speaker Marcus Engle and bid on some fantastic auction items from your phone.

Scan the QR code to view the items in our silent auction. 

Programs

Our programs bring people together with a common goal of supporting one another and staying mentally well.

Resources

If you or a loved one is struggling with their mental health, these local and national resources may be able to help.

Opportunities

There are many ways to support our efforts, from donating to volunteering to attending a fundraising event.

Nearly 1 in 5 adults in the United States live with a mental illness.
Source: National Institute of Mental Health
In 2019, suicide was the second leading cause of death for people ages 10–34 and the fourth leading cause for ages 35–54.
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
An estimated 31% of adults in the United States experience an anxiety disorder at some time in their lives.
Source: Harvard Medical School National Comorbidity Survey
Suicide rates in youth ages 10-24 increased by 57% between 2007 and 2018.
Source: National Center for Health Statistics
On average, 2 Oklahomans ages 10-24 die by suicide every week. Data from the Oklahoma Violent Death Reporting System (OKVDRS) show that in 2016, more Oklahoma youth ages 10-24 died by suicide than by cancer, heart disease, HIV, chronic lower respiratory disease, complicated pregnancies, congenital anomalies, influenza, and pneumonic combined.
Source: Oklahoma State Department of Health. Oklahoma Youth and Young Adult Suicide Report. Pps. 1-26.
Over the past 10 years, suicide rates among youth in Oklahoma have been above those for the United States. Oklahoma ranked 10th highest (worse) in the nation for youth suicide death rates among all states from 2012-2016.
Source: Oklahoma State Department of Health. Oklahoma Youth and Young Adult Suicide Report. Pps. 1-26.
The majority of youth suicide deaths in Oklahoma were among males. The Oklahoma youth male suicide rate increased 102% since 2007. Among races, both genders of American Indian/Alaskan Native, non-Hispanics 10-24 years of age had the highest rates of suicide.
Source: Oklahoma State Department of Health. Oklahoma Youth and Young Adult Suicide Report. Pps. 1-26.
The Oklahoma youth male suicide rate is over 4 times that of the rate for 10-24 year old Oklahoma resident females.
Source: Oklahoma State Department of Health. Oklahoma Youth and Young Adult Suicide Report. Pps. 1-26.
Current mental health problems and intimate partner problems are the 2 leading circumstances associated with youth suicide in Oklahoma. Data from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) showed that 1 in 4 students reported they felt sad or hopeless almost every day for 2 weeks in a row, so much so they stopped doing some usual activities.
Source: Oklahoma State Department of Health. Oklahoma Youth and Young Adult Suicide Report. Pps. 1-26.
Firearms, hanging/strangulation, and poisoning were among the leading methods of suicide among youth.
Source: Oklahoma State Department of Health. Oklahoma Youth and Young Adult Suicide Report. Pps. 1-26.
As youth age, alcohol was more likely to be present at the time of death with 40% of those testing positive in the 20-24 age group. Roughly half of all youth were tested for substances other than alcohol at the time of death. Overall, only 5% of the youth tested for other substances tested positive.
Source: Oklahoma State Department of Health. Oklahoma Youth and Young Adult Suicide Report. Pps. 1-26.
In 2017, females were significantly more likely than males to have seriously considered attempting suicide during the 12 months before this YRB survey, 27.8% and 10.9% respectively.
Source: Oklahoma State Department of Health. Oklahoma Youth and Young Adult Suicide Report. Pps. 1-26.
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Breaking the stigma about mental health

Changing the stigma of mental health problems is essential to improving outcomes. The Mom & Mitchell Foundation is dedicated to raising awareness about mental health issues. We seek to help people struggling with mental health challenges by providing resources and a community of support to aid in their journey toward mental wellness.

About The Mom & Mitchell Foundation

The Mom & Mitchell Foundation is being created to raise public awareness of mental health and wellness, educate the public on mental health issues, promote activities to improve health and wellness, and reduce the morbidity and mortality resulting from psychological and psychiatric diseases.

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